Importing thing to remember: This tech stuff is secretly fun

There’s a lie we tech folks tell ourselves–and anybody else who will listen–that what we’re doing is tough, arduous, and demanding work. It involves impossible demands, long hours, and nothing we do is ever completely perfect, or completely finished. In short, programming is hard work.

We start out telling folks this because it is difficult, demanding stuff, and we do put in crazy amounts of work at the keyboard, and stress ourselves out thinking about it all the time. We would like your admiration for all we go through, but since what we go through is largely incomprehensible and makes terrible stories at dinnertime, we’ll settle for your pity.

We tech types work marathon shifts, drink coffee by the gallon, and run ourselves ragged, all the while telling ourselves how bad we’ve got it. But here’s the truth–a truth we rarely admit to even ourselves: we’re secretly enjoying the whole thing, because it’s just about the most interesting game we’ve ever played.

Solving technical problems on computers is fascinating stuff, involving incredibly complex mental models, and elaborate systems built out of nothing but thoughts organized into code. It’s an amazingly creative pursuit, where you can think of an idea for a feature, and merely by thinking through all the angles of it in enough detail, can convert that idea into code, and thus into existence.

Even debugging is a challenge better than most mystery books, where your job is to solve the mystery of some strange occurrence, see it for what it really is, and slowly trace it back to the malformed code which perpetrated it. From there, you have to either tear up the bad code outright (risking the creation of new bugs in the process), or craft a suitable fix to restore the proper working of the system.

This stuff is downright fascinating. And on many days, we’d do it even if we didn’t get paid.

But we do get paid–and most of us fairly well at that–because it’s indeed difficult stuff, which requires ridiculous amounts of patience and knowledge, as well as a constantly replenished skill set to keep up with a technical landscape which is ever changing.

As deadlines loom and project problems pile up, it can also have an element of terror built in, as problems which would be fun to solve if there was more time to muck about with them suddenly become the narrowing jaws of a vice that threatens to crush you if they aren’t worked out by the time the ship date arrives.

At times like this, I often think back to a notable economics lecture in college where the professor demonstrated the law of diminishing returns by proposing “the Beer Game”. The  game goes as follows: He agrees to buy a string of beers for you, but whenever he buys you a beer,  you have to drink it.

“Wow!” we all thought, and on the hot autumn day he told the story, I was thinking that the first beer would taste awfully good indeed. The second would also be good–if not quite as refreshing as the first. But as the game goes on, each beer brings you less and less pleasure, and you’d eventually reach the point where you’d be willing to pay the instructor to be let out of the game.

Getting a software release out reminds me a lot of that game. As you dream up features and do the initial exploration, it’s a dream job, full of hope and creativity. As things ramp up and you have to work the technical details out, it’s still engaging, but seems more work and less fun. And then there’s always the terrible crush of deadlines at the end, where the non-stop work and pressure make you feel like the college kid trying to get out of the old econ professor’s beer-buying game. Only in this case, the only way out is through.

But then, if you don’t crumble under the pressure, you ship the product, the pressure evaporates, and in a while, a part of you starts looking forward to doing it all over again.

As I write this, I’m still catching my breath a bit and doing a little tidying up after a very major software release indeed. And yes, I’m happy to tell anyone who will listen about all the pain we went through to bring our new creation to life. We’re all incredibly proud of the new release, but there’s definitely a part of us that knows that there are far easier ways to make a living, and wonders why we keep putting ourselves through all this.

And here’s the truth: it isn’t just a way to earn a living, and it isn’t entirely about the pride we have in bringing something cool to life (although there’s a lot of that too). It’s because despite it all, it’s the most fun we’ve ever had while”working.” And despite our grousing–even to ourselves–we secretly know we’re having a blast.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s